Achievement levels

This pages offers a comparison of NAEP and the Kansas assessments. It is a work in progress.

NAEP Reading, Grade 4

Basic (required score: 208)

Fourth-grade students performing at the Basic level should be able to locate relevant information, make simple inferences, and use their understanding of the text to identify details that support a given interpretation or conclusion. students should be able to interpret the meaning of a word as it is used in the text.

Proficient (required score: 238)

Fourth-grade students performing at the Proficient level should be able to integrate and interpret texts and apply their understanding of the text to draw conclusions and make evaluations.

Advanced (required score: 268)

Fourth-grade students performing at the Advanced level should be able to make complex inferences and construct and support their inferential understanding of the text. Students should be able to apply their understanding of a text to make and support a judgement.

KANSAS Reading, grade 4

Here are the performance categories for “general” (non-special ed) students 

“Academic warning” [Score: 0-56 percent correct]
When independently reading grade-appropriate narrative, expository, and technical text, an unsatisfactory student has incomplete comprehension:

This student is not likely to construct literal meaning that matches the author’s intended meaning. This student struggles to recognize

  • the topic, main idea, and supporting details
  • vocabulary in context
  • correct retelling
  • the author’s purpose
  • text features
This student is not likely to make connections or perceive relationships in order to construct inferential meaning. This student struggles to
  • draw accurate conclusions
  • compare and contrast
  • determine cause and effect

This student is not likely to recognize techniques authors use to communicate their ideas with words. This student struggles with

  • text structures
  • the difference between fact and opinion
  • literary elements of fiction (setting, character, plot)

Approaches standard [score: 57-67 percent correct]

When independently reading grade-appropriate narrative, expository, and technical, text, a basic student has partial comprehension:

This student constructs literal meaning that inconsistently and/or inaccurately matches the author’s intended meaning. This student is likely to have a limited recognition of

  • the topic, main idea, and supporting detials
  • vocabulary in context
  • correct retelling
  • the author’s puprose
  • text features

The student makes minimal connections and perceives inaccurate relationships in order to construct inferential meaning. The student inconsistently and/or inaccurately

  • draw conclusions
  • compare and contract
  • determines cause and effect
The student recognizes simple techniques authors use to communicate their ideas with words. The student is likely to have limited awareness of
  • text structures
  • the difference between fact and opinion
  • literary elements of fiction (setting, character, plot)

Meets standard [score: 68-80 percent correct]

When independently reading grade-appropriate narrative, expository, and technical text, a proficient student has satisfactory comprehension:

This student constructs literal meaning that generally matches the author’s intent. This student is likely to recognize

  • the topic, main idea, and supporting details
  • vocabulary in context
  • correct retelling
  • the author’s purpose
  • text features

This student makes obvious connections and perceives some relationships to construct inferential meaning. This student is likely to

  • draw accurate conclusions
  • compare and contrast
  • determine cause and effect
This student recognizes simple techniques authors use to communicate their ideas with words. This student is likely to have awareness of
  • text structures
  • the differences between fact and opinion
  • literary elements of fiction (setting, character, plot)

Exceeds standard [score: 81-88 percent correct]

When independently reading grade-appropriate narrative, expository, and technical text, an advanced student has full comprehension:

This student constructs literal meaning that closely matches the author’s intended message. The student recognizes
  • the main ideas and supporting details
  • vocabulary in context
  • a correct retlling
  • the author’s purpose
  • text features
This student makes connections and perceives complex relationships to construct inferential meaning. The student will
  • draw accurate conclusions
  • compare and contrast
  • link cause and effect

This student recognizes techniques authors use to communicate their ideas with words. The student accurately

  • identifies text structures
  • distinguishes between fact and opinion
  • identifies literary elements of fiction (setting, character, plot development)
Exemplary [score: 89-100]
When independently reading grade-appropriate narrative and expository text, an exemplary student has full comprehension, making connections within and outside the text:

This student constructs literal meaning that accurately matches the author’s intent. The student understands
  • the topic, main idea and supporting details
  • vocabulary in context
  • a correct retelling
  • text features
The student makes subtle or complex connections and perceives relationships to construct inferential meaning. The student will
  • draw conclusions
  • compare and contrast
  • link cause and effect
  • recognize implied main idea
The student understands complex techniques authors use to communicate their ideas with words. The student accurately
  • identifies text structures (problem and solution, sequence)
  • identifies literary elements of fiction (setting and character)

(Source file; text in bold reflects source document.)

(Here’s the source file for all cut scores.)

 

NAEP Reading (grade 8)

Basic (required score: 243)

Eighth-grade students performing at the Basic level should be able to locate information; identify statements of main idea, theme, or author’s purpose; and make simple inferences from texts. They should be able to interpret the meaning of a word as it is used in the text. Students performing at this level should also be able to state judgments and give some support about content and presentation of content.

Proficient (required score: 281)

Eighth-grade students performing at the Proficient level should be able to provide relevant information and summarize main ideas and themes. They should be able to make and support inferences about a text, connect parts of a text, and analyze text features. Students performing at this level should also be able to fully substantiate judgments about content and presentation of content.

Advanced (required score: 323)

Eighth-grade students performing at the Advanced level should be able to make connections within and across texts and to explain causal relations. They should be able to evaluate and justify the strength of supporting evidence and the quality of an author’s presentation. Students performing at the Advanced level also should be able to manage the processing demands of analysis and evaluation by stating, explaining, and justifying.

Source page for reading definitions.

NAEP Math (grade 4)

Basic (required score: 214)

Fourth-grade students performing at the Basic level should show some evidence of understanding the mathematical concepts and procedures in the five NAEP content areas.

Fourth-graders performing at the Basic level should be able to estimate and use basic facts to perform simple computations with whole numbers, show some understanding of fractions and decimals, and solve some simple real-world problems in all NAEP content areas. Students at this level should be able to use—though not always accurately—four-function calculators, rulers, and geometric shapes. Their written responses will often be minimal and presented without supporting information.

Proficient (required score: 249)

Fourth-grade students performing at the Proficient level should consistently apply integrated procedural knowledge and conceptual understanding to problem solving in the five NAEP content areas.

Fourth-graders performing at the Proficient level should be able to use whole numbers to estimate, compute, and determine whether results are reasonable. They should have a conceptual understanding of fractions and decimals; be able to solve real-world problems in all NAEP content areas; and use four-function calculators, rulers, and geometric shapes appropriately. Students performing at the Proficient level should employ problem-solving strategies such as identifying and using appropriate information. Their written solutions should be organized and presented both with supporting information and explanations of how they were achieved.

Advanced (required score: 282)

Fourth-grade students performing at the Advanced level should apply integrated procedural knowledge and conceptual understanding to complex and nonroutine real-world problem solving in the five NAEP content areas.

Fourth-graders performing at the Advanced level should be able to solve complex and nonroutine real-world problems in all NAEP content areas. They should display mastery in the use of four-function calculators, rulers, and geometric shapes. The students are expected to draw logical conclusions and justify answers and solution processes by explaining why, as well as how, they were achieved. They should go beyond the obvious in their interpretations and be able to communicate their thoughts clearly and concisely.

NAEP Math (grade 8)

Basic (required score: 262)

Eighth-grade students performing at the Basic level should exhibit evidence of conceptual and procedural understanding in the five NAEP content areas. This level of performance signifies an understanding of arithmetic operations—including estimation—on whole numbers, decimals, fractions, and percents.

Eighth-graders performing at the Basic level should complete problems correctly with the help of structural prompts such as diagrams, charts, and graphs. They should be able to solve problems in all NAEP content areas through the appropriate selection and use of strategies and technological tools—including calculators, computers, and geometric shapes. Students at this level also should be able to use fundamental algebraic and informal geometric concepts in problem solving.

As they approach the Proficient level, students at the Basic level should be able to determine which of the available data are necessary and sufficient for correct solutions and use them in problem solving. However, these eighth-graders show limited skill in communicating mathematically.

Proficient (required score: 299)

Eighth-grade students performing at the Proficient level should apply mathematical concepts and procedures consistently to complex problems in the five NAEP content areas.

Eighth-graders performing at the Proficient level should be able to conjecture, defend their ideas, and give supporting examples. They should understand the connections between fractions, percents, decimals, and other mathematical topics such as algebra and functions. Students at this level are expected to have a thorough understanding of Basic level arithmetic operations—an understanding sufficient for problem solving in practical situations.

Quantity and spatial relationships in problem solving and reasoning should be familiar to them, and they should be able to convey underlying reasoning skills beyond the level of arithmetic. They should be able to compare and contrast mathematical ideas and generate their own examples. These students should make inferences from data and graphs, apply properties of informal geometry, and accurately use the tools of technology. Students at this level should understand the process of gathering and organizing data and be able to calculate, evaluate, and communicate results within the domain of statistics and probability.

Advanced (required score: 333)

Eighth-grade students performing at the Advanced level should be able to reach beyond the recognition, identification, and application of mathematical rules in order to generalize and synthesize concepts and principles in the five NAEP content areas.

Eighth-graders performing at the Advanced level should be able to probe examples and counterexamples in order to shape generalizations from which they can develop models. Eighth-graders performing at the Advanced level should use number sense and geometric awareness to consider the reasonableness of an answer. They are expected to use abstract thinking to create unique problem-solving techniques and explain the reasoning processes underlying their conclusions.

Source page for mathematics.

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